Pit Boss Smoked BBQ Beef Ribs

Who doesn’t love ribs? That juicy, succulent meat falling off bone and bbq dripping down your chin, heaven!

So if you’re looking to smoke for a Pit Boss beef ribs recipe that will make you look like a true pitmaster, your in the right place, I have my favorite beef ribs recipe here!

Why You’ll Love This Beef Rib Recipe!

Beef ribs have definitely grown in popularity in recent years, and they are now just as popular as pork ribs. While both are great for smoking, barbecuing, and grilling, you’ll want to go with the beef option if you want meatier ribs.

I do find smoking beef ribs a bit easier than pork ribs is a huge bonus! Less work for me! Also beef also has a higher fat content and connective tissue, resulting in ribs that are more juicy and tender.

The Different Kinds of Beef Ribs

A cow typically has 13 ribs on each side of its body. And these ribs can be split into three types — short ribs, back ribs and chuck ribs

They all have their differences. but they all make excellent choices for making fall-off-the-bone ribs. But in this recipe I am using short ribs. This type of rib is very meaty and usually have 3 to 5 bones, as you can see below.

Short Ribs

Short ribs are cut from the rack’s front and back ends. They can be further categorized as plate ribs and chuck ribs. Because short ribs are so close to the brisket cut of meat, they actually have more fat.

Plate short ribs come from the bottom part of the animal’s rib cage. On the other hand, chuck short ribs refer to the bones that form the first to the fifth rib.

Chuck Ribs

Chuck ribs are much shorter in length when compared to plate ribs. But they still have quite a bit of meat — even if it’s enough to make chuck roast beef sandwiches.

Back Ribs

The ribs closest to the cow’s shoulder are referred to as beef back ribs. Back ribs aren’t particularly large, measuring only six to eight inches in length. These are especially excellent for slow cooking with indirect heat, so back ribs are excellent for smoking.

What You Need for Smoked Beef Ribs

  • Beef back ribs
  • Black pepper
  • Favorite steak rub (Here’s an easy recipe suggestion!)
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Watrer
  • Binder

How to Make Smoked Beef Ribs

Step 1: Prep The Ribs

You’ll notice that there’s actually a thin membrane that covers the bones. This membrane actually doesn’t break down during the cooking process. That is why you’ll need to use a sharp knife to remove it off the bones.

Once you’ve begun to separate it from the rib bone, you should be able to easily peel the rest of it off.

2. Seasoning The Ribs

Pat ribs dry with paper towel, Coat with mustard – this is to help the rub stick. Apply the dry rub onto the ribs — be sure that it’s evenly coated. 

You should leave the ribs to marinate for at least 20 minutes. But, as always, we recommend leaving it in the fridge to marinate overnight. This will not only give the meat more flavor, but it will also help to tenderize it.

2. Smoking The Ribs

It is simple to smoke these ribs. Place the ribs on the grill grates with the bone facing the heat source. The timing will depending on how thick your ribs are. For ribs around 1 inch, they will take around 5-7 hours, 1.5 inches will take 6- hours and 2 inches will take 8-10 hours.

After two hours of cooking and once the bark started to develop spitz the ribs every 60 minutes. Use a mix of water and apple cider vinegar with A 50/50 ratio.

Now you need to monitor the temperature, you want the ribs to be around 203°F – 205°F. Once hit that temperature and your internal meat probe goes into the ribs like butter, you know they are ready.

4. Resting The Ribs

Once the probe is able to go in and out like its butter and you have hit 203°F-205°F you want to really carefully remove them from the grill. You don’t want to damage that delicious bark at this point.

Wrap the ribs in butchers paper or alumium foil and allow to rest. You want to allow 30-60 minutes of resting before you start to slice and serve.

If your guests aren’t ready to eat, you can use the faux cambro method. Grab a cooler box and place your meat in it.

What Temperature to Smoke Beef Ribs

You want to cook your ribs at around 250°F – 280°F.

What to Spritz Beef Ribs With

You can spray your ribs a few different liquids, some that make for a flavorful rib spritz are beer, apple cider vinegar, apple juice and broth. You should dilate it with 1:1 ratio with water.

Pour everything into a clean spray bottle and you’ve got a great spray you can coat the ribs with during the smoking process.

How Long To Smoke Beef Ribs on a Pit Boss

Once the Pit Boss is at 250 degrees Fahrenheit, you can place your rack of ribs in. Smoke for approx. 5-8 hours.

Always make sure that the meat side is facing up. To ensure that the meat stays moist and flavorful, you can begin spritzing the ribs as soon as the meat reaches a temperature of 160°F.

When to Wrap Beef Ribs

You should wrap your beef ribs just for the resting period, otherwise you don’t get a good bark developing.

What Temperature Should You Smoke Ribs Too?

Smoke until the internal temp of the ribs is approx. 203°F-205°F.  Meat should have no resistance to probe.

How Long to Rest Beef Ribs

Rest ribs for approx. 30-60 minutes in an empty cooler.  Fill the empty space with towels to retain heat.Then it’s ready for you to slice up and serve with some sides!

smoked beef ribs reicpe

Pit Boss Smoked Beef Ribs

Charlie
With the perfect blend of herbs and spices, this simple beef back recipe offers the perfect smoky finish!
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 hours
Total Time 5 hours 20 minutes
Course Main Course
Cuisine American, Barbecue, bbq, dinner, grill
Servings 6 serves
Calories 526 kcal

Equipment

  • Grill or BBQ

Ingredients
  

  • 2 racks Beef Back Ribs
  • ½ tbsp Black pepper
  • ½ cup Steak Rub
  • ½ cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 2 tbsp Tabasco Hot Sauce can be adjusted accordingly
  • ½ cup Soy Sauce

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your Pit Boss Grill to 250 degrees F.
  • Cut the thin membrane from the bone side of the ribs with a sharp knife.
  • Season the ribs with the steak rub. Make sure the ribs are evenly coated.
  • Leave the ribs to marinate for 20 minutes. Fro extra flavour and tender, leave the ribs in the fridge overnight.
  • Combine the wet ingredients — apple cider vinegar, soy sauce, Tabasco hot sauce — together.
  • Pour everything into a clean spray bottle to coat the ribs during the smoking process.
  • Once the Pit Boss is at 250 degrees Fahrenheit, place the ribs on the grill grates with the bone facing the heat source. The timing will depending on how thick your ribs are. For ribs around 1 inch, they will take around 5-7 hours, 1.5 inches will take 6- hours and 2 inches will take 8-10 hours.
  • After two hours of cooking and once the bark started to develop spitz the ribs every 60 minutes. Use a mix of water and apple cider vinegar with A 50/50 ratio.
  • Now you need to monitor the temperature, you want the ribs to be around 203°F – 205°F. Once hit that temperature and your internal meat probe goes into the ribs like butter, you know they are ready.
  • Once the probe is able to go in and out like its butter and you have hit 203°F-205°F you want to really carefully remove them from the grill. You don’t want to damage that delicious bark at this point.
  • Wrap the ribs in butchers paper or alumium foil and allow to rest. You want to allow 30-60 minutes of resting before you start to slice and serve.
Keyword Beef, Smoked, Smoked Beef

We hope that our article has inspired you to give it a go as well. Good luck!

Smoke On!

Charlie

Hi, I’m Charlie, I have been meat-smoking and grilling for the past 15 years. I have an array of different smokers, thermometers, and have a love for finding the right wood and charcoal combo My favourite recipes are my EXTRA CRISPY smoked pork belly, juicy pulled pork, smoked brisket, duck poppers, and ANY SEAFOOD I grill).

I loves sharing his tips with beginners, helping them navigate the world of smoking. I find it’s not just about cooking; it’s a quest for that perfect smoky flavor.

You will usually find me playing with the kids, perfecting my brisket bark, or sipping beers with boys around the fire. Can’t wait to share all my delicious smoking and grilling recipes with you!

You can read more about me on our About Us page.

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